History

Ancient World History challenges students to examine the development of cultures from creation to 1400 AD. Course themes will include foundations of government and nation-building, leadership, patterns of interaction, and development and usage of technology. In addition, students will examine geography’s impact on history.  The foundation for this course is thinking historically and much emphasis will be placed on reading and writing skills: causation, historical interpretation and synthesis, and the ability to craft historical arguments from primary and secondary sources. Students will participate in in-class activities such as lectures, debates, and group exercises/projects.

Modern World History challenges students to examine the development of cultures from approximately 1450 AD to the present. Course themes will include industrialization, modern nation building, colonialism, mercantilism, modern economic theories and application, the road to revolution, leadership, patterns of global interaction, and development and usage of technology. In addition, students will examine geography’s impact on history.  The foundation for this course is thinking historically and much emphasis will be placed on reading and writing skills: causation, historical interpretation and synthesis, and the ability to craft historical arguments from primary and secondary sources. Students will participate in in-class activities such as lectures, debates, and group exercises/projects.

United States History will demonstrate the overall hand of God in the construction of a new nation. Students will study the major turning points in American history in the twentieth century. Following a review of the nation’s beginnings and the influence of the enlightenment on U.S. democratic ideals, students will study global industrialization to understand the emergence and outcomes of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects. They will then trace the change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movement toward equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the role of the United States as a major world power. An emphasis is placed on the expanding role of the federal government and federal courts, as well as the continuing tension between the individual and the state. Students will consider the major social problems of our time and trace their causes through historical events, thus applying historical references to their own lives.