English

English I is a survey course which covers the basic styles and genres of literature and writing. It is designed to set up students for success throughout high school. Beyond academic comprehension, writing skills, and appreciation for literature, students will grow in their understanding of who God is and who he has created them to be.

English II is a survey course which builds off the material taught in English I. It covers the basic styles and genres of literature and writing. It is designed to set up students for success throughout high school. Beyond academic comprehension, writing skills, and appreciation for literature, students will grow in their understanding of who God is and who he has created them to be.

English III:  American Literature covers the major authors and works from American culture. Reading selections will differ greatly in genre and style. Some material will require more time and effort to comprehend than other literature courses. However, all selections have merit as literary works of art and as examples of the cultural development of the nation. Beyond academic comprehension, writing skills, and appreciation for literature, students will grow in their understanding of who God is and who he has created them to be.

English IV:  British Literature covers the major authors and works from British culture. Reading selections will differ greatly in genre and style. Some material will require more time and effort to comprehend than other literature courses. However, all selections have merit as literary works of art and as examples of the cultural development of the nation. Beyond academic comprehension, writing skills, and appreciation for literature, students will grow in their understanding of who God is and who he has created them to be.

Advanced Placement Language and Composition provides an opportunity for students to pursue and receive credit for lower-division college-level course work.  At a minimum, students must complete all assignments and homework, just as if they were participating in a college course.  The class will focus on writing skills in a variety of modes (i.e., analyzing text, responding to passages, and writing argument, persuasion, etc.).  The course will train students in critical thinking, reading, writing and speaking as they respond to a variety of texts that represent different time periods and cultures. The writing tasks are meant to prepare students to pass the AP Language exam in the spring.   Students will write effectively for a range of audiences and a variety of purposes, demonstrate mastery of the conventions of standard written language, and use the steps of the writing processes as needed.

Advanced Placement Literature and Composition students will become better readers and writers, learning how to closely analyze the texts they encounter.  Through the careful analysis of such literary elements as figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone, students will begin to better appreciate an author’s style and structure and are then equipped to understand the themes of a particular work. Students will read a wide variety of texts that span various literary periods and genres.  While the course will require more reading than previous English classes, it is still a priority that students work closely with those texts, digging deeply as we explore those texts. This is accomplished through thoughtful reading of the texts, participation in whole class and small group discussions, and writing (both in class and out). Learning from each other and listening to what others have gained from their reading is a benefit of this AP course.

 

History

Ancient World History challenges students to examine the development of cultures from creation to 1400 AD. Course themes will include foundations of government and nation-building, leadership, patterns of interaction, and development and usage of technology. In addition, students will examine geography’s impact on history.  The foundation for this course is thinking historically and much emphasis will be placed on reading and writing skills: causation, historical interpretation and synthesis, and the ability to craft historical arguments from primary and secondary sources. Students will participate in in-class activities such as lectures, debates, and group exercises/projects.

Modern World History challenges students to examine the development of cultures from approximately 1450 AD to the present. Course themes will include industrialization, modern nation building, colonialism, mercantilism, modern economic theories and application, the road to revolution, leadership, patterns of global interaction, and development and usage of technology. In addition, students will examine geography’s impact on history.  The foundation for this course is thinking historically and much emphasis will be placed on reading and writing skills: causation, historical interpretation and synthesis, and the ability to craft historical arguments from primary and secondary sources. Students will participate in in-class activities such as lectures, debates, and group exercises/projects.

United States History will demonstrate the overall hand of God in the construction of a new nation. Students will study the major turning points in American history in the twentieth century. Following a review of the nation’s beginnings and the influence of the enlightenment on U.S. democratic ideals, students will study global industrialization to understand the emergence and outcomes of new technology and a corporate economy, including the social and cultural effects. They will then trace the change in the ethnic composition of American society; the movement toward equal rights for racial minorities and women; and the role of the United States as a major world power. An emphasis is placed on the expanding role of the federal government and federal courts, as well as the continuing tension between the individual and the state. Students will consider the major social problems of our time and trace their causes through historical events, thus applying historical references to their own lives.

 

Bible

Behold your God presents factual content and personal application material. It’s a study of who God is described as in scripture. Students will understand biblical theology, and they will also be challenged to better reflect God’s character with their thoughts, speech, and actions.

Leadership and Apologetics seeks to develop character, maturity, and present God’s view of a true leader while also diving into some of the most common questions about life and the Christian faith. The class will go through two different materials. The first material is on leadership called “The Inner Man” challenges the student to develop an awe of God and apply His example of leadership in their lives. The second one is an Apologetics material which explores  how a biblical worldview provides the best explanations for some of the toughest questions in life.

Worship Development provides students a place to practice their musical talent while leading worship. It gives hands on experience leading services and all the behind the scenes preparations. The goal is to have students who develop and lead passionate, authentic worship done with excellence. Worship class is part of our bible classes and each student individually works through Bible curriculum for their grade level.
Worship class rotates through a worship related lesson, Bible component lesson and musical practice/ service preparation. We lead worship weekly and for school events.

 

Math

Pre-Algebra prepares students for the study of algebra.  Topics covered include problem solving, expressions, variables, algebraic properties, linear equations, inequalities, functions, ratio, proportion and percents, Cartesian coordinate system, factors and fractions, rational numbers, statistics and probability.

Algebra 1A/B is a two-year course in Algebra (Algebra 1A and Algebra 1B) that covers basic Algebra topics including the following: linear equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and their graphs, and linear systems of equations.  The topic of word problems is also given extensive development. This course emphasizes on building a firm foundation for future math courses.

Algebra 1 is a one-year course in Algebra that covers basic topics including the following: linear equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and their graphs, and linear systems of equations.  The topic of word problems is also given extensive development. This course emphasizes on building a firm foundation for future math courses.

Geometry  uses the properties and application of common geometric figures in two and three dimensions to build the more abstract concepts of logic and reasoning.  Deductive reasoning skills are developed by using theorems and definitions to develop formal proofs. The topics covered are basic plane geometry such as points, lines, and planes as well as three dimensional geometry.  Properties and relationships of parallel and perpendicular lines will be covered throughout the text to build deeper understanding of the properties of triangles and other polygons and build an understanding of congruence, similarity and proportions.  These topics will provide the basis of an exploration of the special properties of right triangles and basic trigonometry.

Algebra 2 is a third-year Algebra 2 course. The unifying subjects for this course of advanced algebra and geometry are straight lines and the figures they produce – polygons and polyhedra.  From the beginning of the course, vectors and parametric equations are used to model motion in two and three dimensions.

Honors Pre-Calculus is designed to prepare students for a beginning college calculus course or for a high school AP Calculus course.  The course provides an in-depth study of relations, functions, their inverses and graphical representations in the Cartesian plane.  Working algebraically with functions in solving systems of equations, working with rational and polynomial functions of degree two and above as well as logarithmic and exponential functions.  Trigonometry is studies in greater detail than in previous courses including the mastery of fundamental identities and algebraic solutions to equations involving trigonometric functions. Analytic geometry, vectors and linear algebra constitute another building block of the course with an introduction to complex numbers and mathematical induction rounding out the topics.

AP Calculus is designed to prepare the student for the AP Calculus AB exam. Calculus will be explored through the interpretation of graphs and tables as well as analytic methods. The use of technology is integrated throughout the course to provide a balance approach to the teaching and learning of calculus that involves algebraic, numerical, graphical and verbal methods.

AP Statistics is a beginning college-level course in the methods and practice of statistics.  The fundamentals of collecting, representing and most importantly understanding what inferences may be drawn from collected data are an essential part of this course.  Students will learn to collect data and to design experiments so that bias is minimized and that predetermined levels of confidence in the outcome may be realized. Computational tools such as statistical calculator functions, spreadsheets and Minitab are utilized for visualization and modeling. The course is designed around the College Board’s requirements for a class carrying the title of AP Statistics and is rigorous in preparing the students for that exam.  By the end of the course, students will not only have mastery for the AP exam, they will each work on a final projects which will involve them in designing an experiment, implementing their plan and conducting confidence tests on their data and presenting thoughtful inferences and conclusions while defending their choice of methodology.

 

Science

Conceptual Physics offers the subject matter of a traditional physics course with a qualitative approach to problem-solving.  Of principal investigation are the relationships between matter and energy and how God uses them in the universe. The format includes lecture/discussion, problem solving and project completion.  There are projects which demonstrate students’ mastery of course materials. General areas of study will include mechanics, motion, astronomy, heat, light, sound, magnetism and electricity.

Biology is a laboratory course that explores the interrelationships of life and the physical world around us. Central to this course is a fundamental understanding of God’s creation and the unique place humans occupy therein.  Some areas of study include cellular and molecular biology, ecology, genetics, energy pathways of life, bioethics, and species diversity. Students will also become aware of science career connections. This course meets the subject area – d requirement for the UC/CSU approved course list.

Advanced Placement Biology is an introductory college-level biology course. Students cultivate their understanding of biology and God’s governance of life processes through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular processes—energy and communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions among species.  

Chemistry is a laboratory based course which meets college or university requirements for entrance. It is designed to meet the needs of both the prospective science major and of the serious student who desires a general knowledge of the field without becoming a science major. Topics will include, but are not limited to, atomic theory, gas laws, stoichiometry, spectroscopy, elements, compounds, acids and bases, equilibrium, and the historical development of chemistry, all with a full range of laboratory work.  The course also emphasizes the role of God in the creation of all matter and his governing of relationships better and within all types of matter.

 

World Language

Spanish 1 follows our 7th grade introduction course.  Students continue listening, reading, writing, and speaking Spanish. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme, grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities along with speaking and reading activities. Students complete the first 9 chapters of their Buen Viaje text and workbooks.

Spanish 2 picks up after Spanish 1 and is structured to re-emphasize all four aspects of language learning: reading, writing, speaking, and a heavy emphasis on meaningful communication. The students will continue to work out of and complete their Buen viaje text and workbooks.

Spanish 3 is designed to develop the students’ skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening to Spanish.  Students will learn to use Spanish appropriately in a range of settings and situations and for a variety of purpose.  The testing and assessment program in Spanish 3 includes tests that combine grammar and content, structure and situation for the purpose of analyzing student performance.  

Spanish 4 is an honors class designed for students who have successfully completed three years of Spanish and who desire to become more proficient in reading, writing, speaking, and listening in Spanish.  Students will learn to use Spanish appropriately in a range of settings and situations and for a variety of purpose. The student will learn the Spanish language itself and about the Spanish speaking world – its fascinating history, culture and above all, its great need for the gospel of Christ.

 

Visual and Performing Arts

Photography will help the students become well rounded in the fundamentals of photography.  Four areas of instruction will be emphasized: how cameras work, how composition works, how lighting works, and basics of how to use photo editing software. Students will receive basic instruction, demonstration, and see samples of the desired outcomes, at the beginning of each period.  There is a major emphasis placed on the student for self-directed work time. This includes time during school hours to go outside and shoot assignments based on what they are learning. Perhaps the most useful part of classroom instruction will be daily reviews of photos students have shot the previous day(s).  They will see what makes a successful photo and what does not. Furthermore, students will explore how their faith can be expressed and communicated through the photographic medium.

Yearbook is part design, part business. Units of study include teamwork, responsibility, brainstorming, content, coverage, concept, reporting, writing, headlines, captions, editing, photography, typography, design, graphics, finances, yearbook campaigns, social media, marketing, and distribution.

Dance Company is a performance-based class that fulfills the Rock Academy’s art credit (high school only) OR one year of PE requirement. Students learn beginning-intermediate dance technique, experience dance production, and learn a variety of dance styles from ballet to ballroom and modern/contemporary to hip-hop. Students perform at school and community events.

Choreography and Performance teaches students to apply choreographic principles of theme and variation, repetition, levels of space, tempo, and musicality to create a 30-minute touring program and educational outreach. Students will attend and critique professional dance performances, analyze technique from pioneers in modern choreography, as well as work with outside choreographers to both strengthen their individual technique and compose their own material. Ongoing technical instruction in ballet and jazz technique as well as performance and flexibility will accompany the choreographic process.

Art 1 is an intro two-semester course designed to expand the students’ knowledge, abilities, and critical judgments of art using various techniques and media that align with state standards and the principles and elements of art.

Visual Communications is the art and skill of combining visual text and images to communicate. In communicating visually, the course will focus on the elements and principles of design and apply them to images and text using Adobe Creative Suite.

 

Physical Education

High School PE builds upon the general physical preparedness worked upon in Middle School PE. Students are introduced to the realms of Strength and Conditioning as a means to better prepare them for athletics and a healthy lifestyle. This encompasses not just exercise but proper nutrition, rest, and work-life balance.

 

Electives

Home Economics students will learn the principles as well as develop the skills and knowledge to effectively meet the following goals: good health, and nutrition, become responsible parents and family members, manage personal finances, become positive leaders and citizens, and make educated choices.  This course is designed to prepare students to one day live on their own by learning and practicing valuable living skills.

PILLARS Study Skills is the instructional part of the Academic Support Program where training includes: Time Management, Organizational Skills, Goal Setting, Listening and Note-Taking Skills, Textbook Study Strategies, Test Preparation, and Test-Taking Skills.  Focused intervention and tutoring are part of the program and class. Mentoring which promotes academic excellence, organization, and confidence in a Christ-centered environment. Academic accommodations implemented for students with documented learning differences, weekly analysis of student performance in the regular classroom, and regular progress reports and contact with parents are all components of the PILLARS program and Study Skills Class.

Associated Student Body Leadership is a one year elective course designed for students who want to get involved in the planning and implementation of Rock Academy activities and are seeking to enrich both school and community. Students enrolled in leadership will learn the following leadership skills standards: project planning and implementation, problem solving, public speaking, interpersonal communication, team building, working collaboratively, critical thinking, goal setting, and time management. As a Christian school, the purpose of Rock Academy ASB is to serve and minister to the student body, school and church staff, and to those in the neighboring communities. With Jesus Christ as our ultimate example, Rock Academy’s ASB will strive to exemplify the same attitude of humility, obedience, and servanthood in its role of leadership.

College and Career Counseling has been created for The Rock Academy’s students and their parents to make the college selection and application process easier to navigate, and to provide general information regarding the colleges,  universities, or trade schools of their choice. Our program should serve as a resource and reference for the questions usually asked about the process. It is our belief that two principles prevail throughout:

  1. Each student’s best interests are served through good communication among  the four parties involved – the students, the school, the parents and the universities.
  2. Colleges and universities make their decisions based on a holistic approach of the applicant – the student’s total secondary school record (academic and personal), extracurricular pursuits, recommendations (counselor, teacher, and supplemental), personal essays, demonstrated interest (campus visit and interviews), and standardized test scores, if required* (SAT and ACT Tests, SAT II Subject Tests, Advanced Placement Exams, etc.).   We believe we can help facilitate the process and create the environment for these principles to prevail.